Don’t Mess with the NBN

Source: Hello! Canada Magazine 2014

Source: Hello! Canada Magazine 2014

In a busy household with a family of five, having ubiquitous connectivity to the internet is a necessity. Each member of the family use the internet to further their individual knowledge and self-discovery. The family home is connected to a wireless asymmetric digital subscriber line (ADSL) modem router. The ADSL delivers high speed data transmissions over copper telephone lines but the National Broadband Network (NBN) has revolutionised “high speed” internet. The ADSL modem has failed the family on various occasions resulting in an unpleasant experience. My mother hopes the NBN will have a positive impact on the family, resulting in an endless, enjoyable internet adventures. Surprisingly, each family member has access to over 8 devices which could connect to the internet. The devices were connected to various service providers: Telstra, Optus and TPG providing assorted internet data plans.

The NBN is an Australian wide project aiming to upgrade existing phone lines and internet network infrastructure. On behalf of the Federal Government the NBN plans to connect more than 93% of Australian homes with fast broadband. The iiNet is Australia’s second largest leading NBN service provider and is offering a variety of plans to suit residential and business needs. The iiNet commercials are targeting individuals connected to the NBN and future users to connect to their internet plans. This can been seen in the humorous commercial below.

In a discussion with my family they were mostly optimistic and looked forward to having access to the NBN. My mother states, “I will be happy to see my children have access to fast internet speeds, I won’t have to listen to them throwing tantrums anymore.” Similarly, my sister can’t wait to be connected to the NBN, the internet will work at anytime and anywhere without any interruptions. Currently, the location of the house is not included in the NBN rollout. The family were not impressed that the NBN will take a while for it to be installed in the area before they will see any benefits.

According to the Australia Bureau of Statistics (2012) Australia’s population is in excess of 21 million but only 11.6 million are internet subscribers. More than 96% of subscribers have broadband access via either mobile, satellite or fixed line connections (Cradduck 2012, p. 2). Due to the NBN not being distributed evenly, there are multiple disadvantages for areas which are not connected. With the internet becoming a central feature of family life, the NBN will affect the dimensions of family communication.

It will have widespread beneficial effects, along with widespread negative effects. There will be conveniences and privacy violations. There will be new ways for people to connect, as well as new pathways to isolation, misanthropy, and depression (Anderson & Rainie 2014).

Mobile phones allow for easy and on-the-go internet access and using them at family dinners is becoming a social norm in family households. The internet may be eroding family time but the NBN will provide a new layer of interaction. The NBN will provide reliable internet which will offer family members the chance to share moments of exploration and entertainment.

The NBN will play an important role in delivering e-Learning services for Australia’s future education system. E-learning will give opportunities for students to learn beyond the classroom walls and access with ease more international resources. At the same time, e-learning will need to be continually assessed on how effectively content material engages and positively impacts students. “Successful e-Learning delivery will require the continuing tailoring of materials, and methods of delivery, to suit the individual needs of learners,” (Cradduck 2012, p. 3). E-learning will be beneficial for students but it does pose challenges to students living in remote rural areas. In addition, students who are from low income families may be marginalised because they will not be able to bring a technology (iPad) to school or complete homework at an unconnected home.

According to the Akamai 2014 State of the Internet Report, Australia is ranked 42 in the world in terms of average connection speeds, despite the 39% increase in average internet connection speeds. However, Australia is down nine positions from the previous quarter, casting a dark shadow on the NBN rollout. The table below illustrates the top 10 countries with the highest average connection speeds. Australia needs to step up there game because it’s astonishing to see what countries snuck their way to the top 10.

Source: Hong 2014

Source: Hong 2014

The NBN aided by technological devices will empower individuals and organisations to expand their horizons. High speed internet will enable people to obtain information for health and education purposes. Furthermore, reliable broadband will allow individuals to maintain contact with friends and families from interstate and internationally. In order to ensure this occurs the rollout of the NBN will need to reach all Australians for it to be adopted as a successful project. If not, a minority of us are going to be connected but in our own little worlds.

References

Anderson, J & Rainie, L 2014, The Internet of Things Will Thrive by 2025, Pew Research Internet Project, viewed 20 August 2014, http://www.pewinternet.org/2014/05/14/internet-of-things/

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2012, Household Use of Information Technology, Australia, 2012- 2013, cat. No. 8146.0, accessed 20 August 2014, http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/8146.0Chapter12012-13

Cradduck, L 2012, ‘The Future of Australian e-learning: it’s all about access’, e-Journal of Business Education & Scholarship of Teaching, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 1-11, viewed 20 August 2014, http://eprints.qut.edu.au/55900/2/55900.pdf

Hello! Canada Magazine, 2014, The 10 best ‘Mean Girls’ quotes, image, Hello! Canada, viewed 20 August 2014, http://ca.hellomagazine.com/film/0201401244613/the-10-best-mean-girls-quotes

Hong, K 2014, Internet Speeds, image, The Next Web, viewed 20 August 2014, http://thenextweb.com/insider/2014/06/27/akamai-global-average-internet-speed-24-year-year-3-9-mbps-mobile/

Hong, K 2014, Akamai: Global average web speed up 24% annually to 3.9 Mbps, 20% of connections now above 10 Mbps, The Next Web, weblog post, 27 June, 20 August 2014, http://thenextweb.com/insider/2014/06/27/akamai-global-average-internet-speed-24-year-year-3-9-mbps-mobile/

Advertisements
By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM240

Cheers to the Viewers!

Source: Daily Mail Australia 2013

Source: Daily Mail Australia 2013

Audience measurement benefits advertisers and marketing agencies looking to attract new customers and existing consumers. Audience research is divided into different media markets such as television viewership, radio listenership and print readership. Television Audience Measurement (TAM) is a dominate media research analysis, it provides quantitative and qualitative information about television audiences. The Nielsen Company strives to establish a recognised global standard for TAM operations as more advertising agencies expand internationally, they need to understand how to target multinational Television audience information.

In Australia the official television audience measurement is OzTAM, covering free-to-air and subscription TV in Australia’s five mainland metropolitan markets. OzTAM provides the media industry with accurate data on the performance of television programs and networks. The independent company assists advertisers to understand viewer behaviour and characteristics, supporting the development and planning of advertisements.

According to OzTAM records, the 100th State of Origin Game was the most-watched TV event of the year so far. More than 2.7 million people watched Game Two, The Blues 12 to 8 win over the Maroons at Suncorp Stadium. It gave the Nine network a record ratings win and it’s the biggest audience for the game since OzTAM began in 2001. Sydney had a whopping 1.2 million viewers, closely followed by Queensland with 857,000 viewers.

Source: Turner, 2014

Source: Turner, 2014

The next hottest most-watched non-sport event of the night was Ten’s MasterChef with 859,000 viewers, followed by Home And Away with 850,000 and Ten’s drama Offspring with an audience of 823,000.

Every year NRL’s State of Origin series dominates free-to-air TV, previously the biggest State of Origin audience had been Game Three in 2012 with 2.62 million, not far behind was this year’s Game One with 2.6 million. On social media, more than 8 million unique visitors checked out the official NRL, QLD and NSW Facebook pages for State of Origin Two.

The highly anticipated State of Origin clash gave advertisers the popularity boost they needed. Both XXXX and VB launched their advertising campaigns in the hope to increase sales. To mark XXXX’s 24th year of sponsorship of the Queensland State of Origin team, ‘The King’ of Queensland Wally Lewis appears on cartons, cans and bottles of XXXX special edition beer ranges.

Source: Below and Beyond, 2014

Source: Below and Beyond, 2014

Sponsor rival Victoria Bitter (VB) launched the ‘Name in the Game’ campaign, at all three State of Origin games, VB replaced the word ‘VICTORIA BITTER’ on the front of the NSW jersey with the names of 46 Blues fans. The increased TV ratings throughout the State of Origin series gave both XXXX and VB a financial boost.

The goal of the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) is to achieve transparency in audience data collection and to revise out-of-date methodologies. The IAB is responsible for selling 86% of online advertising in the United States. The IAB audience research management guidelines provides information on the appropriate controls related to Internet-based content and advertising. All audience measurement reports have the potential to impact marketing and decision-making practice. Therefore, IAB believes all companies involved in audience measurement should be audited to eliminate measurement discrepancies and to find solutions to the problems.

When audience measurement is conducted in an ethical manner, the ratings are an important tool used by advertisers in the aim to target a specific audience. As seen in the State of Origin campaign 2014, the ratings not only assisted both VB and XXXX advertisements. The high ratings allowed NRL executives to find solutions on how to increase viewership on Telstra Premiership matches. Do we all benefit? The advertisers indeed win financially and the viewers are bombarded by attention-grabbing advertisements.

References

Below & Beyond 2014, Royally Approved by King Wally XXXX, image, Below & Beyond, viewed 17 August 2014, http://www.belowandbeyond.com.au/

Daily Mail Australia 2013, The Great Gatsby, image, Ninemsm, viewed 17 August 2014, http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2302162/The-Great-Gatsby-drums-excitement-ahead-release-new-character-posters.html

Turner, S 2014, State of Origin Returns to the MCG, image, NRL, viewed 17 August 2014, http://www.bulldogs.com.au/news/2014/06/02/state_of_origin_returns_to_the_mcg.html

By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM240

The Good Old Days

Source: Matthew 2012

Source: Matthew’s Island of Misfit Toys 2012

In 1963 my mother was born in Wollongong, Australia, she was the oldest of three children to immigrant parents who came to Australia from Macedonia in 1958. She grew up in a 1930s weatherboard tin roof 3 bedroom house in Corrimal. When questioned about her memories of watching TV, she recalls the TV set being on the floor in the family living room in front of a couch against a wall. She fondly remembers that it was an effort to change the channels on the varnished mahogany timber TV set which balanced on 4 timber legs. Due the TV having no remote control, when turning the knob on the TV set the black and white TV screen would flick on and off. She said, “The TV screen clarity and sound from back then to now have improved dramatically.”

When she moved into a newly built house at the age of 14 her TV watching experience changed. In 1975 her parents purchased a brand new coloured TV set and on top of it sat a photograph of the happy family of 5 dressed in their Sunday best. There was only one TV in the house which resulted in many arguments over what TV shows to watch.

Before starting school in the mornings she would watch cartoons such as Road Runner and Tom & Jerry. On a hot summer afternoon she would sit with an ice block alongside her siblings and watch Gilligan’s Island, I Dream of Jeannie, Lost in Space and Batman. Asking my mother about TV shows she used to watch as a child brought back memories of the TV shows theme song. “Nanananana Batman… Batman, Batman,” she sings with a smile. One of her favourite TV shows was the Thunderbirds, a science-fiction show with puppets. My mother reminisced the episodes when the host of the TV show Romper Room held a magic mirror and would great the children by a selection of names daily. “It made my day when she would say ‘Hello Suzie.’”

If school homework was not complete or if she misbehaved the TV would be banned. But she always seemed to manage to finish her homework by the time her father came home from day shift at BHP Steelworks. Her smile would be from ear to ear when her father approved her homework and she was allowed to watch Adventure Island. “I was excited and happy watching my favourite TV shows,” she said.

Watching TV was a family and social experience. The whole family would sit on the couch and watch Skippy the Bush Kangaroo, Hogan’s Heroes and The Brady Bunch. With her cousins they would argue about which girl in the show they would be. Of course my mother chose Marcia because like her she was the oldest of the girls.

Growing up as a teenager she enjoyed watching soap operas such as Young and the Restless and the Days of Our Lives. “Oh I could not miss an episode!” she said. My mother looked to Actresses on various TV shows for inspiration, “I always wanted to be a Charlie’s Angel.” Getting all her latest fashion and hairstyles she would religiously watch Dallas and Dynasty. On the odd occasion she would watch action shows like Hawaii Five-0 and Magnum. She knew not to interrupt her Dad when he watched his favourite criminal shows Homicide and Division 4.

A comedy show brought the family together e.g. the Blankety Blank, Hey Hey it’s Saturday, The Don lane Show and Family Feud. The family living room would transform into a dance floor when the shows Bandstand and Young Talent Time played.

The biggest hit with the family was old Hollywood movies starring Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor and Doris Days. “James Dean was one of the most handsome man to take over the big screen.” Not to mention the crush she had on Elvis Presley and Paul Newman.

Although the shows my mother and I watched as a young child were completely different. The universal theme that ties our TV experience together is happiness. As my mother reminisced about her early childhood experiences it triggered her to remember the song lyrics to her favourite shows. I had an epiphany that our childhood TV memories were not only the best but brought the family closer together.

Reference

Matthew’s Island of Misfit Toys 2012, TV happiness shared by all the family!, image, Matthew’s Island of Misfit Toys, viewed 10 August 2014, https://mattsko.wordpress.com/2012/06/04/

By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM240

The Smart Phone Addiction

Welcome everyone to my BCM240 blog! I’m officially back in the blogosphere and look forward to discussing the issues and innovative ideas surrouding the audiences’ interaction with different media spaces. My name is Bianca and I am a second year Communication and Media student at the University of Wollongong.

On the weekend I was doing what girls to best, shopping! I could not help but realise that majority of the people in the shopping centre were using their smart phone in some way. Walking from shop to shop I had to dodge people who were oblivious to the crowd; their eyes were glued to their smart phone screen. I noticed people of all ages obsessing with there smart phone. A child sitting in front of a shopping trolley is kept occupied by playing a game on his mother’s iPhone. A group of young teenage girls drinking coffee at Gloria Jeans sit in silence as they scroll through Facebook and Instagram. We are a society that is highly dependant on smart phones but at the same time we are forgetting how to engage in public. In public spaces we are becoming more introvert and a little less extrovert.

Technology has revolutionised the way we communicate and the way we shop. More shops are becoming media savvy and are using social media to attract customers. We are constantly downloading the newest social media apps from the App Store and Google Play. When I was waiting in line at a Priceline check out, the flyer in the below photograph caught my attention. Priceline allows customers in-store to connect to their free Wi-Fi service and receive exclusive offers via there Priceline App. Also customers can visit Priceline’s Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and Instagram accounts to keep up to date with the latest beauty and health care products.

I began my day with the mission to have a social media free day but who was I trying to fool. Who knew going shopping would be a challenge? Different companies are now more than ever using social media platforms to capture the customers attention. I could not resist the temptation and the thought of missing out on something. I would call it a social media addiction. End result, smart phone 1 and Bianca 0.

Started From the Bottom Now We Here

Here we are BCM111. Over the semester I have been informed on new concepts and have developed a better understanding on various issues. Their were three topics in particular that altered my opinion which were globalisation, international education and climate change.

The concept ‘globalisation’ is responsible for uniting world communities. However I have learnt that globalisation has a dark side, it diminishes cultural diversity. I believe globalisation shows no sign of slowing down. Globalisation of communication provides people to feel a sense of community although they may live in opposite parts of the globe. Marshall McLuhan’s term ‘the global village’ provides individuals the opportunity to express and share information on the internet. As a result, online diverse communities feel a sense of empowerment with the imaginative thought of disappearing borders. On the other hand, globalisation could lead to homogenisation and contribute to the destruction of cultural diversity.

I viewed Australia has a multicultural nation, accepting different nationalities and religion. However, I had to think again, are we? Australia is parochial, individuals in society restrict themselves from getting to understand international students. The highly publicized violent attacks on Indian students in 2009-10, portrayed the Australia culture as ethnocentric. International students contribute significantly to Australian society; there presents heavily impacts the strength of the Australian economy. In order to achieve harmony in Australia, we must engage in cosmopolitanism. Instead of being hesitant to overcome our differences we must accept and value that the world is filled with diversity.

I believe majority of people are uninterested in the issue of climate change because it won’t affect them in their lifetime. However, climate change is having a dramatic impact on the pacific small island states. Unfortunately the inhabitants of Kiribati have become vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, with rising sea levels destroying their houses and there way of life. The media should stop presenting false balance about climate change and society should limit their negative contribution to climate change. Australia is not invincible sooner or later we too will be feeling the negative effects.

By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM111

Climate What? Oh that thing…

Source: Scullys fireworks

Source: Scullys fireworks

In today’s society I believe when it comes to the challenges presented to us by climate change, we either further go on to support the issue or look the other way. It is unfortunate that some people consider climate change as none of their responsibility. I believe majority of people are uninterested in the issue of climate change because it won’t affect them in their lifetime. However, is it not important to protect the livelihoods of future generations from the negative repercussions of climate change? Furthermore, it is as if people are wearing black veils and are oblivious to the negative effects it will have on the human race and species.

Journalists are faced with the challenge whether to provide balance on climate change issues and provide a ‘voice to the voiceless’ (Ward, 2009). The term ‘false balance’ refers to journalists reporting both sides of the environmental debate of climate change. According to Ward (2009, p. 14) “reporters may for too long have been balancing opinions.” The media should stop presenting false balance about climate change and society should just face the music.

It is clearly obvious that climate change is having a dramatic impact on the pacific small island states. Unfortunately the inhabitants of Kiribati have become vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, with rising sea levels destroying their houses and there way of life. This is evident in the below picture. Although the locals produce little greenhouse gas emissions they are at the forefront of the issue. The Pacific Calling Partnership provide locals with assistance in training and up skilling. Educational programs give an opportunity for locals to become skilled members. When there time comes to leave, they will not just be seen as climate change refugees but as skilled workers. The transition to another country will be difficult, the challenge that arises is how locals will maintain and sustain cultural identity.

Source: RTCC

Source: RTCC

Australia’s iconic Bondi Beach is under threat due to rising sea levels and the possibility that high tides will flood parts of Sydney. According to Hashan and Hannam (2013), “The latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, released on Friday, found the sea level would rise and could be expected to be up to 80 centimetres higher by the end of the century.” The below image reveals how Bondi Beach will look in 2100, it is evident beachfront infrastructure will have the direct impact.

Source: The Sydney Morning Herald

Source: The Sydney Morning Herald

By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM111

We Want the Truth

Source: Lambert Planet

Source: Lambert Planet

Let the day begin. Breakfast with i98fm. Lunch with The Illawarra Mercury. Dinner with The Project. Oh how can I forget those late afternoon snack breaks with Facebook. I am oblivious to the variety of news sources that I read, watch and listen to. News organisations trigger me to form a perception about the people involved in the news story. Thus, news sources have the ability to reshape my opinion. It’s made me question if news sources present the audience with ‘the truth’ or a ‘packaged story’.

Breaking news keeps us up-to-date with information regarding local, national and international events. The news is the result of a series of selections, framing is a strategy used to select and exclude information to suit the news organisations best approach of presenting the news story. It is important that we evaluate news sources for:
-Variety of views
-Cultural bias
-Story structure
-Backgrounds of interviewees
-Gender, ethnicity and organisation positioning of the reporter.

A news story must contain one of the following aspects for it to been seen as holding news value e.g. cultural proximity, relevance, rarity, continuity, elite reference, negativity, composition and personalization.

In 2011, the events of the Arab Spring attracted worldwide attention with ‘a jump of more than a third in coverage in international news,’ with ‘Middle East unrest’ filling 12 per cent of what they term the newshole” (Lee-Wright, 2012 p. 6). A variety of networks such as NBC and CBS broke 20 year records with the amount of international news they presented. However, the Arab Spring anniversaries was not seen as worthy to appear as a breaking news story on top news programs (Lee-Wright, 2012).

The media industry is dominated by males who embrace authority, while female journalists pursue to crack the Perspex ceiling. Majority of the news we read, watch and listen to is produced by male journalists. In the above videoUS television royalty Barbara Walters reveals how woman presenting the news were not taken serious. However, she indicates woman are just as capable of presenting the news as men. I believe female journalist will strive to break the Perspex ceiling because their determination and motivation is the key to success.

Source: Alice Arnold

Source: Alice Arnold

Reference
Lee-Wright, P 2012, ‘News Values: An Assessment of News Priorities Through a Comparative Analysis of Arab Spring Anniversary Coverage’ JOMEC Journal: Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies.

By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM111

Look at Moiye…Look at Moiye!

These days it’s not difficult to watch American TV shows back to back, they seem to be dominating our TV screens. I must admit on numerous occasions when I have watched American comedy such as Two and a Half Men and Modern Family, I have misunderstood the cultural translation. Maybe if I paid more attention to the Ad break during the week, I could have been watching Hamish and Andy Asia Gap Year. Which leads me to think I would have not had the imaginary cultural brick wall that prevented me to understand. The translation of comedy perceived by a particular audience has a significant impact on the success of the TV series.

The process of comedy translation is an important factor that influences the cultural contextual understanding of TV shows. Turnbull (2008, p.115) indicates a “successful translation of a comedy depends not only on the translation of the cultural context from one locate to another, but also on the kinds of production deals which are made.” In addition, the choices made by casting directors and the performance of the chosen main characters has a significant impact on our how the audience perceives the comedy translation.

Source: Mia Freedman

Source: Mia Freedman

American television networks have selected to pay homage to original TV series Kath & Kim and The Office. However, the American version of Kath & Kim, which premiered on NBC in 2008 failed to appeal to the American culture. It is suggested that the series was ‘lost in translation’ and there were many factors that contributed to the downfall of the show. In the Australian series we all know Kim as the hilarious wanna-be princess but in reality she is a woman with a bulging size 10 body and is oblivious to her trashy personality. However, in the American series Kim is far from that, Kim is played by Selma Blair an attractive tiny size 8 who is appealing to the eyes. Turnbull (2008, p. 112) refers to the American version as “not monstrous enough to be clichés, stereotypes, parodies or even brave enough to be abhorrent or funny.” The juxtaposition of the characters of the image above reveals the American series loses the irony. Therefore, it is important to understand the surrounding factors of television translation, if an Australian comedy TV show is successful, it does not result in the American remake to be just as popular.

On the other hand, Australia has effectively remade numerous American reality TV shows from Australia’s Next Top Model, Beauty and the Geek and to the debut of The Bachelor Australia in September 2013. Knox (2013) reveals “The Bachelor is one of the longest-running and most successful television franchises in the world, with productions in 24 countries”. There are 18 seasons in the U.S and the current series airs in Australia on Go! Will have to wait and see if the Australian Prince Charming will find his true love and if the Australian version will be a success. The below video of “The Baby Bachelor”, is a parody created by Late night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel. It is evident that translation of a comedy can be lost in certain TV shows, but in this case the translation of love is universal.

Reference
Turnbull, S 2008, ‘It’s Like They Threw a Panther in the Air and Caught it in Embroidery’: Television Comedy in Translation’ Metro Magazine Issue 159.

Knox, D 2013, Ten Hands a Rose to the Bachelor Australia, TV Tonight, weblog post, 9 May, viewed 14 September 2013,

By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM111

Move Over Hollywood!

Source: Maltastar

Source: Maltastar


The global film industry has experienced a paradigm shift from International cinema to transnational cinema. Transnational forces are allowing the global film industry to expand; go beyond the boundaries. Since the 1930s, Hollywood has dominated the film industry with 80% of films being screened around the world. In today’s society films are being distributed and produced from all corners of the globe. Schaefer and Karan predict that Asian film industries will dominate the global film flows from the Western world. Hybridity is allowing Asian film Industries to mix and create new transcultural forms. As hybridised content spreads, ‘glocalisation’ enables local communities to form economic and cultural relationships with the global system. For Asian film industries to succeed, both terms reveal mixing both global and local elements are essential in appealing to audiences and wider markets.

Global film flows are blurring “…the boundaries between the modern and the traditional, the high and low culture, and the national and the global culture” (Schaefer and Karan, 2010 p. 309). China and India have strong economic, political and cultural interests that pose a challenge to the west.

Li Huiqun (2010)believes that Globalization will bring more opportunities to the Chinese film industry as well as more challenges. Due to Chinese culture, originating from Confucian, it does not encourage innovation and creativity. Therefore to protect the local market, the Chinese government has imposed a strict quota system on importing foreign films into China.

However, the Asian film industry has overcome the constraints; successfully attracting Non-Asian international audiences with unique cultural content. Hollywood is embracing martial arts and Wuxia sequences featuring talented actors such as Bruce Lee and Jackie Chan. Combining traditional cultural elements and hybridity enables American film producers to be inspired by Chinese legends. For example Mulan (Disney, 1998) and Kung Fu Panda (Disney, 2008). The ‘Mulan’ video trailer below clearly shows Wuxia narrative and Chinese folktale.

By far Indian films have “the best chance of challenging Hollywood’s hegemony in the movie making world” (Schaefer and Karan, 2010 p.310). Over the last decade other film industries such as Bollywood and Nollywood are challenging Hollywood’s hegemony. Cultural Hybridity is an important factor that contributes to the Bollywood industry being successful. The below video emphasises Bollywood’s as an upcoming powerful player in the global film industry. Bollywood’s annual film turnover is a staggering $4 billion and collaborations with western film industry results in cinema hits.

The Transcultural film industry enables diverse and rich hybrid films to be produced. With the increasing technological advancements showing no sign of slowing down, the internet, cable television, satellite networks and DVD distribution will allow the global film industry to flourish. Watch out Hollywood!

Reference
Huiqun, L. 2010, “Opportunities and challenges of globalization for the Chinese film industry”, Global
Media and Communication, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 323-328

Karan, K and Schaefer, DJ 2010, ‘Problematizing Chindia: Hybridity and Bollywoodization of popular Indian cinema in global film flows’ Global Media and Communication, Vol. 6, No. 3

By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM111

The Rising Domination of Media Capitals

Source: Idaho State University

Source: Idaho State University


New patterns of media flow are emerging throughout the world and are impacting audiences. The media capitals are ‘switching points’, places where things come together and generate a new culture of mass media. The complexity of spatial flows and the global media environment are expanding. The three major media capitals are Hollywood, Hong Kong and Chicago. There are many factors that shape and influence these media capitals such as cultural forms (film, radio, music) and social forms (migration, geopolitics, capitalism) (Curtin, 2003).

“Media capitals, then, are sites of mediation, locations where complex forces and flows interact. They are neither bounded nor self-contained entities… media capital is a relational concept, not simply an acknowledgement of dominance” (Curtin 2003, p. 205). Therefore, media capitals have the potential to influence global entertainment and audiences.

In 2009-2010 the racist attacks on Indian students in Melbourne tarnished the global image of a multi-cultural Australia. The rise of India as a new media capital inflated the political and economic power of India, especially Indian TV media. Indian networks were seen as Orientalist, taking advantage of Australia’s failure to make Indian students feel safe. Various mediums of Indian media exaggerated the story of the attacks and failed to address law and order issues.

According to Sukhmani Khorana (2012) the 70 CNN-style TV channels that pump out news 24 hours a day played up the Bollywood-esque drama of the story. Indian television networks were seen as valuing quantity over quality. As a result, the Indian media had a negative effect on Australia’s international student market. Consequently, Australia-India political, economic and cultural relations were severed.

The above video of the ABC news story on International Indian students, emphasises the importance of Australia to maintain a good image of its student exchange program. It is a necessity for Australia to continue to attract international students as they contribute $5 billion to the national economy. Therefore, new media capitals have the power to influence and impact Australia.

Reference
Curtin, M 2003, ‘Media Capital: Towards the Study of Spatial Flows’, International Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 202-228.

Khorana, S 2012, ‘Orientalising the new media capitals: The Age on Indian TV’s Hysteria’ Media International Australia, vol. 143, pp.39-49.

By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM111