Climate What? Oh that thing…

Source: Scullys fireworks

Source: Scullys fireworks

In today’s society I believe when it comes to the challenges presented to us by climate change, we either further go on to support the issue or look the other way. It is unfortunate that some people consider climate change as none of their responsibility. I believe majority of people are uninterested in the issue of climate change because it won’t affect them in their lifetime. However, is it not important to protect the livelihoods of future generations from the negative repercussions of climate change? Furthermore, it is as if people are wearing black veils and are oblivious to the negative effects it will have on the human race and species.

Journalists are faced with the challenge whether to provide balance on climate change issues and provide a ‘voice to the voiceless’ (Ward, 2009). The term ‘false balance’ refers to journalists reporting both sides of the environmental debate of climate change. According to Ward (2009, p. 14) “reporters may for too long have been balancing opinions.” The media should stop presenting false balance about climate change and society should just face the music.

It is clearly obvious that climate change is having a dramatic impact on the pacific small island states. Unfortunately the inhabitants of Kiribati have become vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, with rising sea levels destroying their houses and there way of life. This is evident in the below picture. Although the locals produce little greenhouse gas emissions they are at the forefront of the issue. The Pacific Calling Partnership provide locals with assistance in training and up skilling. Educational programs give an opportunity for locals to become skilled members. When there time comes to leave, they will not just be seen as climate change refugees but as skilled workers. The transition to another country will be difficult, the challenge that arises is how locals will maintain and sustain cultural identity.

Source: RTCC

Source: RTCC

Australia’s iconic Bondi Beach is under threat due to rising sea levels and the possibility that high tides will flood parts of Sydney. According to Hashan and Hannam (2013), “The latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, released on Friday, found the sea level would rise and could be expected to be up to 80 centimetres higher by the end of the century.” The below image reveals how Bondi Beach will look in 2100, it is evident beachfront infrastructure will have the direct impact.

Source: The Sydney Morning Herald

Source: The Sydney Morning Herald

By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM111

We Want the Truth

Source: Lambert Planet

Source: Lambert Planet

Let the day begin. Breakfast with i98fm. Lunch with The Illawarra Mercury. Dinner with The Project. Oh how can I forget those late afternoon snack breaks with Facebook. I am oblivious to the variety of news sources that I read, watch and listen to. News organisations trigger me to form a perception about the people involved in the news story. Thus, news sources have the ability to reshape my opinion. It’s made me question if news sources present the audience with ‘the truth’ or a ‘packaged story’.

Breaking news keeps us up-to-date with information regarding local, national and international events. The news is the result of a series of selections, framing is a strategy used to select and exclude information to suit the news organisations best approach of presenting the news story. It is important that we evaluate news sources for:
-Variety of views
-Cultural bias
-Story structure
-Backgrounds of interviewees
-Gender, ethnicity and organisation positioning of the reporter.

A news story must contain one of the following aspects for it to been seen as holding news value e.g. cultural proximity, relevance, rarity, continuity, elite reference, negativity, composition and personalization.

In 2011, the events of the Arab Spring attracted worldwide attention with ‘a jump of more than a third in coverage in international news,’ with ‘Middle East unrest’ filling 12 per cent of what they term the newshole” (Lee-Wright, 2012 p. 6). A variety of networks such as NBC and CBS broke 20 year records with the amount of international news they presented. However, the Arab Spring anniversaries was not seen as worthy to appear as a breaking news story on top news programs (Lee-Wright, 2012).

The media industry is dominated by males who embrace authority, while female journalists pursue to crack the Perspex ceiling. Majority of the news we read, watch and listen to is produced by male journalists. In the above videoUS television royalty Barbara Walters reveals how woman presenting the news were not taken serious. However, she indicates woman are just as capable of presenting the news as men. I believe female journalist will strive to break the Perspex ceiling because their determination and motivation is the key to success.

Source: Alice Arnold

Source: Alice Arnold

Reference
Lee-Wright, P 2012, ‘News Values: An Assessment of News Priorities Through a Comparative Analysis of Arab Spring Anniversary Coverage’ JOMEC Journal: Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies.

By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM111

Look at Moiye…Look at Moiye!

These days it’s not difficult to watch American TV shows back to back, they seem to be dominating our TV screens. I must admit on numerous occasions when I have watched American comedy such as Two and a Half Men and Modern Family, I have misunderstood the cultural translation. Maybe if I paid more attention to the Ad break during the week, I could have been watching Hamish and Andy Asia Gap Year. Which leads me to think I would have not had the imaginary cultural brick wall that prevented me to understand. The translation of comedy perceived by a particular audience has a significant impact on the success of the TV series.

The process of comedy translation is an important factor that influences the cultural contextual understanding of TV shows. Turnbull (2008, p.115) indicates a “successful translation of a comedy depends not only on the translation of the cultural context from one locate to another, but also on the kinds of production deals which are made.” In addition, the choices made by casting directors and the performance of the chosen main characters has a significant impact on our how the audience perceives the comedy translation.

Source: Mia Freedman

Source: Mia Freedman

American television networks have selected to pay homage to original TV series Kath & Kim and The Office. However, the American version of Kath & Kim, which premiered on NBC in 2008 failed to appeal to the American culture. It is suggested that the series was ‘lost in translation’ and there were many factors that contributed to the downfall of the show. In the Australian series we all know Kim as the hilarious wanna-be princess but in reality she is a woman with a bulging size 10 body and is oblivious to her trashy personality. However, in the American series Kim is far from that, Kim is played by Selma Blair an attractive tiny size 8 who is appealing to the eyes. Turnbull (2008, p. 112) refers to the American version as “not monstrous enough to be clichés, stereotypes, parodies or even brave enough to be abhorrent or funny.” The juxtaposition of the characters of the image above reveals the American series loses the irony. Therefore, it is important to understand the surrounding factors of television translation, if an Australian comedy TV show is successful, it does not result in the American remake to be just as popular.

On the other hand, Australia has effectively remade numerous American reality TV shows from Australia’s Next Top Model, Beauty and the Geek and to the debut of The Bachelor Australia in September 2013. Knox (2013) reveals “The Bachelor is one of the longest-running and most successful television franchises in the world, with productions in 24 countries”. There are 18 seasons in the U.S and the current series airs in Australia on Go! Will have to wait and see if the Australian Prince Charming will find his true love and if the Australian version will be a success. The below video of “The Baby Bachelor”, is a parody created by Late night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel. It is evident that translation of a comedy can be lost in certain TV shows, but in this case the translation of love is universal.

Reference
Turnbull, S 2008, ‘It’s Like They Threw a Panther in the Air and Caught it in Embroidery’: Television Comedy in Translation’ Metro Magazine Issue 159.

Knox, D 2013, Ten Hands a Rose to the Bachelor Australia, TV Tonight, weblog post, 9 May, viewed 14 September 2013,

By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM111

Move Over Hollywood!

Source: Maltastar

Source: Maltastar


The global film industry has experienced a paradigm shift from International cinema to transnational cinema. Transnational forces are allowing the global film industry to expand; go beyond the boundaries. Since the 1930s, Hollywood has dominated the film industry with 80% of films being screened around the world. In today’s society films are being distributed and produced from all corners of the globe. Schaefer and Karan predict that Asian film industries will dominate the global film flows from the Western world. Hybridity is allowing Asian film Industries to mix and create new transcultural forms. As hybridised content spreads, ‘glocalisation’ enables local communities to form economic and cultural relationships with the global system. For Asian film industries to succeed, both terms reveal mixing both global and local elements are essential in appealing to audiences and wider markets.

Global film flows are blurring “…the boundaries between the modern and the traditional, the high and low culture, and the national and the global culture” (Schaefer and Karan, 2010 p. 309). China and India have strong economic, political and cultural interests that pose a challenge to the west.

Li Huiqun (2010)believes that Globalization will bring more opportunities to the Chinese film industry as well as more challenges. Due to Chinese culture, originating from Confucian, it does not encourage innovation and creativity. Therefore to protect the local market, the Chinese government has imposed a strict quota system on importing foreign films into China.

However, the Asian film industry has overcome the constraints; successfully attracting Non-Asian international audiences with unique cultural content. Hollywood is embracing martial arts and Wuxia sequences featuring talented actors such as Bruce Lee and Jackie Chan. Combining traditional cultural elements and hybridity enables American film producers to be inspired by Chinese legends. For example Mulan (Disney, 1998) and Kung Fu Panda (Disney, 2008). The ‘Mulan’ video trailer below clearly shows Wuxia narrative and Chinese folktale.

By far Indian films have “the best chance of challenging Hollywood’s hegemony in the movie making world” (Schaefer and Karan, 2010 p.310). Over the last decade other film industries such as Bollywood and Nollywood are challenging Hollywood’s hegemony. Cultural Hybridity is an important factor that contributes to the Bollywood industry being successful. The below video emphasises Bollywood’s as an upcoming powerful player in the global film industry. Bollywood’s annual film turnover is a staggering $4 billion and collaborations with western film industry results in cinema hits.

The Transcultural film industry enables diverse and rich hybrid films to be produced. With the increasing technological advancements showing no sign of slowing down, the internet, cable television, satellite networks and DVD distribution will allow the global film industry to flourish. Watch out Hollywood!

Reference
Huiqun, L. 2010, “Opportunities and challenges of globalization for the Chinese film industry”, Global
Media and Communication, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 323-328

Karan, K and Schaefer, DJ 2010, ‘Problematizing Chindia: Hybridity and Bollywoodization of popular Indian cinema in global film flows’ Global Media and Communication, Vol. 6, No. 3

By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM111

The Rising Domination of Media Capitals

Source: Idaho State University

Source: Idaho State University


New patterns of media flow are emerging throughout the world and are impacting audiences. The media capitals are ‘switching points’, places where things come together and generate a new culture of mass media. The complexity of spatial flows and the global media environment are expanding. The three major media capitals are Hollywood, Hong Kong and Chicago. There are many factors that shape and influence these media capitals such as cultural forms (film, radio, music) and social forms (migration, geopolitics, capitalism) (Curtin, 2003).

“Media capitals, then, are sites of mediation, locations where complex forces and flows interact. They are neither bounded nor self-contained entities… media capital is a relational concept, not simply an acknowledgement of dominance” (Curtin 2003, p. 205). Therefore, media capitals have the potential to influence global entertainment and audiences.

In 2009-2010 the racist attacks on Indian students in Melbourne tarnished the global image of a multi-cultural Australia. The rise of India as a new media capital inflated the political and economic power of India, especially Indian TV media. Indian networks were seen as Orientalist, taking advantage of Australia’s failure to make Indian students feel safe. Various mediums of Indian media exaggerated the story of the attacks and failed to address law and order issues.

According to Sukhmani Khorana (2012) the 70 CNN-style TV channels that pump out news 24 hours a day played up the Bollywood-esque drama of the story. Indian television networks were seen as valuing quantity over quality. As a result, the Indian media had a negative effect on Australia’s international student market. Consequently, Australia-India political, economic and cultural relations were severed.

The above video of the ABC news story on International Indian students, emphasises the importance of Australia to maintain a good image of its student exchange program. It is a necessity for Australia to continue to attract international students as they contribute $5 billion to the national economy. Therefore, new media capitals have the power to influence and impact Australia.

Reference
Curtin, M 2003, ‘Media Capital: Towards the Study of Spatial Flows’, International Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 202-228.

Khorana, S 2012, ‘Orientalising the new media capitals: The Age on Indian TV’s Hysteria’ Media International Australia, vol. 143, pp.39-49.

By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM111