“It’s music, it’s hip-hop, it’s ground breaking.”

Source: GeoTorrents

Source: GeoTorrents

Over the years hip hop has transformed into a diverse global popular culture, with many individuals putting their own spin on the style. The hip hop culture originated in New York amongst Hispanic and African American communities during the late 1960’s. It is believed that the real birthplace of it is considered to be the South Bronx – the ghettos of New York, one of the poorest boroughs. In the early 1980’s the dynamic culture was identified as “hip-hop” by DJ Africa Bambaataa.

Hip hop is characterised for its four main components, which include MCing (rapping), DJing, Graffiti and Breaking. Others believe there is a fifth element, Beat-Boxing. The Hip Hop culture has been internationally recognized and is a vehicle for identification. Many societies around the world contribute to the development of the cultural movement. Hip Hop dance can be divided into two categories old school and new school. The old school hip hop styles include locking, popping and break dancing emerged from the USA in the 1970’s. It was not until the late 80’s that new school hip hop styles emerged. The well-known Filipino-American dance group Jabbawockeez received the Living Legend of Hip Hop Award at the World Hip Hop Dance Championship Finals 2012 for their contribution to the world of hip hop culture.

Over the years hip hop has been linked to as being gangsta oriented. The youth of the world were exposed to music videos and film’s portraying gruesome crimes, pimps, hustlers and hoes. The video below clearly indicates hip hop will never die, “Ghetto Gospel” was released by Interscope Records in 2005 nine years after 2Pac’s death. He was notorious for his lyrics stating, “It’s music, it’s hip-hop, it’s ground breaking. When I do it, it’s war.” Regardless of his absence, 2Pac is known as America’s most successful MCs and remains the greatest rapper of all time. Tupac holds the title of the highest selling hip hop artist, selling a total of 67 million records worldwide after his death.

The Hip Hop culture holds great importance for individuals and groups throughout the world. According to Henderson (2006, p.193), “For many other Maori and Pacific Islander dancers, DJs, MCs, and graffiti artists, elements of cultural nationalism and cultural pride transferred through American hip hop forms frequently prompted a similar turn to local languages, local history… of symbolic representation.”

The hip hop culture is constantly evolving and the wicked beats show no sign of slowing down.

Source: dysonology

Source: dysonology

Reference
Henderson, A 2006’Dancing Between Islands: Hip Hop and the Samoan Diaspora’ The Vinyl Ain’t Final: Hip Hop and the Globalization of Black Popular Culture Basu, Dipannita and Sidney J.Lemelle, eds. London: Pluto Press.

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By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM111

A One-way Ticket to International Ambiguity

Source: WCS International Student Program

Source: WCS International Student Program


International students contribute significantly to Australian society; there presents heavily impacts the strength of the Australian economy. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics the international education sector contributed $16.3 million in export income to the Australian economy in 2010-11. The graph below clearly illustrates that international student enrolment has steadily increased over the years. The largest contributor country of international students, with one fifth of all student visa applications lodged and granted were from China. In 2010, there were 617,000 overseas student enrolments in various international education sectors. Therefore, it is important for Australia to keep improving education and social activities. To help achieve the ultimate goal of attracting more international students to come study Down Under.

Source: Australian International Government

Source: Australian International Government

The decision to study abroad can be a life changing experience; along the way international students are faced with many ambiguities. International students have to quickly adjust to their new social and cultural environments. Although they are living far away from home and they are absent from the unconditional love and support provided by their family. International students use this as momentum and motivation to achieve academic success. Kell and Vogl (2007, p.3) state that, “While academic success may heighten a student’s confidence, social and cultural adjustment can be important factor that lead to this academic success.”

Throughout the world Australians are viewed as a friendly nation. However, many Australians live a busy lifestyle and international students struggle to break through the social barriers. Consequently, this leads to alienation, homesickness and anxiety. According to Marginson (2012, p.2), “Australians are often too parochial, trapped within an Australian-centred view of a diverse and complex world.” Revealing individuals within society restrict themselves from getting to understanding international students; believing the Australian culture is ethnocentric. The highly publicized violent attacks on Indian students in 2009-10, resulted in Australia’s relationship with India being severed. Further shock waves were sent throughout the Australian international student community when a group of 6 teenagers tormented two Chinese international students on a train in Sydney. In this technological era Australia could not deny the disgraceful attacks, with one of the victim’s online posting, being re-tweeted more than 10,000 times within a day on Weibo, China’s version of Twitter.

Source: The Indian Express

Source: The Indian Express

In order to achieve harmony in Australia, we must engage in cosmopolitanism. Instead of being hesitant to overcome our differences we must accept and value that the world is filled with diversity.

Reference
Kell, P and Vogl, G (2007) ‘International Students: Negotiating life and study in Australia through Australian Englishes’ Everyday Multiculturalism, Conference Proceedings, Macquarie University, 28-29 September 2006

Marginson, S (2012) ‘International education as self-formation: Morphing a profit-making business into an intercultural experience’ Lecture delivered at the University of Wollongong, 21 February 2012

By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM111

Global Greatness!

Source: Boddunan Source: Boddunan

The concept of globalisation has unleashed positive and negative impacts; the consequences are widely being felt by all countries throughout the world. Globalisation can be defined as an “international community influenced by technological development and economic, political, and military interests,” (O’Shaughnessy and Stadler, 458).

With the robust advancements in technology, globalisation shows no sign of slowing down. Therefore, the globalisation of communication is responsible for people feeling a sense of community although they may live in opposite parts of the globe. Marshall McLuhan’s suggests ‘the global village’ provides individuals the opportunity to express and share information on the World Wide Web. Globalisation allows the internet to act like a transportation vehicle educating, informing and facilitating information on important issues. As a result, online diverse communities feel a sense of empowerment with the imaginative thought of disappearing borders.

On the other hand, globalisation could lead to homogenisation and contribute to the destruction of cultural diversity. There is a variety of choice throughout media industries, however we are living in a world dominated and influenced by one nation, America. Marjority of all television shows, music, choice of food and clothing is influenced by some way or another by America. Just the thought that I could start my day watching a season marathon of Gossip Girl in my Victoria Secrets clothing, followed by having McDonalds for lunch, then listening to Beyoncé on my iPod, while eating a Krispy Kreme in one day makes me feel guilty. What we choose to see and hear is significantly resulting in a loss of nation identity.

Source: Bruno Bento

Source: Bruno Bento

The term globalisation may positively increase economic and financial economies around the world. However, it may cause monopoly of power, intensifying the battle between equality and inequality. Throughout the world the gap between the rich and the poor is significantly expanding. At World Youth Day, 2013, Pope Francis visited the most poverty stricken and violent shantytowns in Rio de Janeiro, his presents drew 3 million catholic pilgrims to the city’s well known Copacabana beach. He called upon the worlds wealthy to end the injustices that marginalise the poor, with an estimated 1.2 million people, or 22 percent of Rio’s population, living in Favelas.

Source: Mario Tamer & Getty Images

Source: Mario Tamer & Getty Images

Therefore the relationship between globalisation and technological developments are having cultural impacts all over the world. Although globalisation unites world communities, at the same time the intrusion of western cultures diminishes the cultural diversity.

By Bianca Tasevski Posted in BCM111